Mario Cipollini

Culturally incompatible – Cycling gear that doesn’t sell

A blog came up on my radar, Jonathon Nunan is a consultant in the bike industy and publishes insider news on his brand new Better Bike Business blog. A February post caught my eye:

Selling cycle clothing in Australia? No hotpants or white Lycra for starters.

It covers a list of do’s and do nots for selling cycle wear in Australia, a good list and explanations such as including UV rated wear, Australian cyclists love full length zipper and women like 3/4 knicks. Surprising is that cycle wear needs to be offered in size 6XL, 8XL and 10XL plus… wow.

That’s a nice example of some of the cycle wear that does and does not sell in Australia, what about the rest of the world?

 

What are the Rules for Cycling Wear?

Do you remember the The Official Euro Cyclist Code of Conduct (by Dom Guiver and Mike Flavell)? It is a goldmine of goodness, here are some excerpts:

Rule 1. Image and style shall be the primary concerns of the Euro Cyclist. When suffering, one must focus first on maintaining a cool, even composure and second on performance. Winning races is an added talent, and only counts if said Euro Cyclist wins with appropriate style.

 

Rule 5. A prominent line where one’s kit ends and where one’s deep tan begins is essential to one’s image. Artificial tanning is BANNED. The tan shall reflect the level of training commitment.

 

Rule 6. The socks of the Euro Cyclist shall extend to within two (2) cm. of the main bulge of the calf muscle, and shall never extend further than one (1) cm. past said primary calf muscle bulge. All socks SHALL BE WHITE in colour with prominent logo placement.

 

Rule 12. Ridiculously stylish eyewear (see endorsed products list) is to be worn AT ALL TIMES without exception. Glasses are to be worn over helmet straps at all times.

There are 63 rules in total, and if you are serious about cycling, you really need to learn them by heart. The most current version is on the OREC (Official Rules of the Euro Cyclist) facebook page.

 

Cycling Brand Matters

Getting a bit more serious, it goes without saying that there are differences between continents and nations with regard to well known and lesser known brands. Popularity can depend on the brand origins, the marketing of the brand among other factors.

Seasons play a role, how cold is winter, how hot is summer. Is professional cycling (road, track, MTB, BMX) popular and what about access to these different styles of cycling.

Consider mountain biking, in one country or region it is considered a fringe sport, a sub culture. In other countries it is an active sport more open to a broader age range and sports cycle wear, even lycra is commonplace.

And even the media and television coverage of cycling events will play a role. If cycling fans see the professionals in the latest gear, the lastest gear is likely to be a big seller – and this includes styles such as long cycling socks.

 

Making or breaking it

While writing, I have been thinking hard, what cycling equipment or cycle wear is truely specific to one country. For every I can think of, I can’t say that it is really specific, such as Americans only wearing white cycling shoes or the British only wearing black helmets. I can say that in Europe, commuter cyclists are more fashionable, particularly where bike riding is a convenient or prefered transport mode. When cycling is less integrated into society, there is a natural focus on safety, so fluro and high visibility wear becomes more important.

So this is a great topic, and for the cycling industry, something most brands should know – so what unique trends have you spotted in cycling, unique to one country or region?

Title Photo: © David Hunter

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