Cycling Rules for Bunch Riding

The Six Most Important Safe Bunch Cycling Rules

Cycling rules can save you from most of the preventable causes of crashes in the bunch or peloton. Embedded inside a group of cyclists, your visibility ahead is reduced to backsides and heads. The wheel in front can be anything from a meter to just centimetres away – the closer the better for drafting but riding too close gives you even fewer escape routes. Fellow riders on your sides and behind mean that each of your actions can cause a chain reaction which ripple through the entire bunch. 

A lot can go wrong, but there are a number of cycling rules for inside the bunch which can keep you safer and help you to avoid many of the situations which can cause a crash.

When you know the cycling rules and etiquette inside the bunch, if others don’t know it then there is still plenty of risk. It is important to openly discuss the cycling rules for your bunch, and to share them with new cyclists so that they know what to expect and how to ride safely in your group.

 

Cycling Rule 1 – Hold your line

This means, be predictable so that other cyclists can anticipate what you are doing. The easiest way to hold your line is to follow directly behind the cyclist in front.

The first example of NOT holding your lines is when riding inside the bunch and you veer left or right. This affects a rider beside you and all riders behind. This place added pressure on other riders to control their bikes and try and work out what you are doing. If you are on open roads and a vehicle is passing, a rider to your side may be forced out too far.

The second example is riding around corners two-abreast. If the outside rider cuts across the corner, they will cut-off the rider inside. Similarly, if the inside rider veers too far on the approach or exit, this can force the outside rider off the road. A dangerous situation for all which means slow a little and ‘hold your line’.

 

Cycling Rule 2 – Look Ahead

Inside a bunch with just the backside of the riders in front to look at, some riders focus their eyes down to the wheel in front. This is dangerous, it is easy to become fixated on the tyre and road and loose proper perception of everything around.

The correct approach is to look ahead, look forward which provides you with a broader field of view and peripheral vision. Though some of your view is blocked, you should be able to see the traffic situation ahead as well as spot the movement of the riders in front.

 

Cycling Rule 3 – Ride Smoothly

Although you are already holding your line, one of the biggest flaws of riders is to surge. Some cyclists pedal fast and reach the wheel of the rider in front, then stop pedalling or even brake. As the slow they have to accelerate again and it creates a surge effect which means that all riders following are affected and it often creates a concertina effect in the peloton.

Inside a bunch, each rider has an important responsibility to try and maintain a constant speed. The aim is to keep the distance between yourself and the rider in front constant.

If you need to make a drastic change – you need to call out to the other riders so that they can prepare.

 

Cycling Rule 4 – Make Small Adjustments

Following on from Cycling Rule 3 and riding smoothly, a peloton will accelerate and brake as the typography, terrain and traffic changes. Rapid acceleration can mean that riders behind are quickly left behind – if you are riding with a friendly bunch, you will want to keep together. Hard braking can be unexpected and lead to crashes.

The best approach are small / micro-adjustments. Rather than accelerating rapidly, keep it steady and constant to slowly build up speed.

To slow down gently and brush off a little speed there are a number of approaches:

Light Pedalling means you continue to pedal but with less force. If you stopped pedalling completely the deceleration could be too rapid, so light pedals is a gentle method.

Air Braking is sitting up higher in your saddle and allowing your chest to catch more air which slows you. This technique is often used on downhills as the following riders have a substantial advantage drafting and quickly start to accelerate and travel faster than the rider ahead. Sitting up can slow you and let you remain nicely spaced behind the rider up front.

Feather the brakes is very lightly applying the brakes to marginally slow you down. Very often cyclists on the road ‘ride on the hoods’ – their grip around the raised brake hoods and the index fingers on each hand resting on the brake levers.

 

Cycling Rule 5 – No Half-Wheeling

Half-Wheeling or Overlapping Wheels is when a rider is no longer directly behind the rider ahead and have edged up closely on the left or right side. Instead of keeping the distance to the rider ahead, the wheels are now ‘overlapped’. This is a very dangerous situation responsible for a lot of bike crashes. If the rider ahead moves unexpectedly, for example to dodge a pothole, they will hit the wheel of the rider following them, often causing both to crash.

In this situation, if the rider behind left a gap then the rider ahead is able to move safely left or right, even without warning.

The cycling rules and etiquette can vary between riding groups, generally a more skilled bunch is able to rider closer together and leave a small gap. A less experienced bunch, or a bunch with a lot of unknown riders should leave a larger gap to the rider in front for safety. In either group, following braking a rider in the bunch who brakes late may find themself half-wheeling and should immediately correct by braking. If necessary, call out to the rider behind that you are slowing.

 

Cycling Rule 6 – Moving Out

Inside the bunch each rider had a position and needs to keep to their position – not only will it make the peloton more efficient (for aerodynamics), it is far better for the safety of all when each rider keeps in position and you can anticipate their actions.

However it can be time to move out of position when there is a paceline (rolling peloton) and each rider takes turns at the front. Perhaps you are tired and can’t keep up to the rider in front so need to move to the back. Or perhaps the traffic situation has changed – there is a hill coming up and you want to give other riders space.

If it is time to move out, signal your intentions, a hand signal may be sufficient for some groups or even a verbal call. Look around to ensure the coast is clear and move out to allow the rider following you to move into your position. The intention is to minimise disruption to the rest of the cyclists.

 

Any more Cycling Rules?

On this page only the rules specific to your riding behaviour inside a group are covered though to be a good, safe an courteous cyclist there is more you need to know. In the Cycling Essentials series these are being covered, you can also find a more comprehensive compilation of cycling rules and good biking etiquette in the Free Bunch Riding guide.

Find and join cycling bunch

How to Find and Join a Cycling Bunch

Joining a cycling bunch is a rewarding way to enjoy cycling and make it a social activity – After all Cycling is the New Golf. It gives you time to connect with others and compare bikes and gear). Your aspirations could be competitive or social and there are a few things to know when joining a bunch. Firstly we will look at finding a bunch and secondly the etiquette for joining onto a cycling bunch of unknown riders. 

How do you find other riders? You probably already know if you are a mountain biker, road cyclist or into other styles of cycling and this (of course) is a good starting point. Here are a few places to start – and remember that it does take some effort on your part which includes going out of your comfort-zone to find the right group of riders.

 

Finding a Cycling Bunch and Riders

 

Colleagues and Friends

Probably the easiest way to start is with colleagues and friends – talk about cycling and pretty quickly you will find out who else rides, and plan to go for a ride together. You can also get referrals from your connections to cycling groups – it is always nice to have an existing connection.

Your Local Bike Shop

Good local bike bikes shops often have shop rides and some even have teams connected to the shop. For the bike shops, they are an excellent way to increase loyalty among customers – and in turn, customers can join regular local rides. Some shops will have different rides, such as monthly rides for beginners and weekly rides for more advanced riders.

 

Your Local Cycling Club or Bicycle User Group

Cycling clubs are generally for competitive cycling and often members will cycle together during training rides which may be organised by the club or independently by members who enjoy cycling together. Some clubs offer recreational membership for riders who are not interested in competing and social rides.

Bicycle User Groups (BUGs) are often recreational and accommodate riders of all ages and abilities. These are a good avenue for riders who are interested in cycle tours in the local region. BUGs may also be orientated towards cycling advocacy and engaged in building or fostering cycling routes in the local area.

 

Online Bunch Ride Finders

There are hundreds of online website which connect cyclists, simply turn to Google. Cyclists will also turn to local cycling forums to reach out to others and connect and other cycling interest groups. While there is often a disconnect between virtual / anonymous communities and the real world, take time to understand and judge a group. Also be aware that a stranger or group of strangers online will not necessarily follow-through and be as reliable as in real life.

 

Etiquette for Joining a new Cycling Bunch

Whether you have found a brand new bunch of cyclists to ride with or your are out on the ride and want to join onto a group of riders, there are a few things worth knowing.

The first is that there is a lot you don’t know. This includes how well each of the other cyclists can ride in terms of fitness, bike handling skills and regard for others. You also don’t know the etiquette of the group – for regular cycling bunches, they may have their own protocols and make assumptions for all riders.

If you have organised to rider with a new group, take a few moments before setting off to discuss etiquette. For example if you are a beginner rider without experience riding the planned route, let this be known. Often there will be a ride leader or senior rider who provides guidance for the whole group – it is worthwhile connecting with them.

In a new bunch, it can make sense to ride at the back and observe until you are familiar and comfortable with the group.

The Unknown Bunch

If you are riding solo and come across another bunch who are riding at a similar speed, it can be nice to join them however etiquette is needed.

Firstly, ask the riders if it is ok to join them. Some groups may prefer not to have unknown riders; they may be concentrating on training or may be wary of the riding ability of strangers. In this case hang well behind the group and if you choose to overtake, don’t slow down.

Similarly, a bunch that overtakes shouldn’t slow down and you can ask them to speed up or drop behind if they are distracting.

For a new bunch, it is worthwhile remaining at the back and some bunches may allow you to join but prefer that you don’t take part in the rolling paceline. If you are welcome in the group, do take your turn on the front of a rolling paceline and don’t be afraid to ask questions.

Follow ride etiquette within the cycling bunch, pointing out obstacles and holes plus signalling your intentions. It is better to do too much, in the effort of safety, rather than not enough. And just as important, chat with the other riders.

Smart Cyclist Bunch Riding Who is in Charge

Who’s in charge in the bunch?

If you enjoy bunch riding, you will also know about the chain reaction effect. One rider brakes and the rest have to be on their toes and react quickly to avoid crashing. But it is more than avoiding crashing, it is about predicting what could happen, knowing what is happening and riding with the safety of other riders in mind – your riding error can have catastrophic repercussions.

In the Smart Cycling – Cycling Essentials series, the free Bunch Riding Guide outlines the approach for safe bunch riding, and this includes “Who’s in Charge”. So who is in charge… surely it is the Lead Rider?

Yes and no. Each and every rider in a bunch or peloton still has a responsibility to all other riders, both in the way they conduct them self and ride, as well as passing calls or signals through the bunch.

Let’s move to the back of the bunch to the Tail-end Rider. Far from just pulling up the rear, the rider at the back has an important role if the bunch needs to change lanes. As the rear most rider, they call-out to inform the bunch whether the bunch can move OVER or needs to WAIT. For multi-lane crossing the call may be OVER ONE or OVER TWO depending on what is safe. Each rider needs to pass this message forward to the lead rider.

In addition, the Tail-end Rider warns of vehicles approaching from behind, and usually provides an indication of the size such as CAR, BUS or TRUCK. If traffic is heavy, the Tail-end rider may also call to suggest that a bunch riding two abreast changes to single-file with the call SINGLE or SINGLE-UP. On hills or situations where riders fall off the back of the bunch, the Tail-end rider can request the bunch to slow or inform the bunch that the riders have rejoined with ALL-ON.

 

The Lead Rider

While all riders have responsibility in the bunch, the Lead Rider is responsible for many of the important calls and signals. And they have make the calls and signals with the safety of all of the riders in mind which means planning ahead and predicting danger scenarios. This is can be as simple and breaking early, slowing (calling SLOWING or STOPPING) and avoiding sudden braking within the bunch. It means slowing starting (after the bunch has stopped) to allow all riders to ‘get on’ and avoid the concertina effect.

Generally, the Lead Rider has to call early and ensure a constant pace which suits all riders with gradual changes (turning, swerving, slowing, accelerating). The Lead Rider often changes as it is a position which often faces the wind and allows the riders following to draft. When the rider signals their intent and moves over, the next rider in line generally takes the lead. These Pacelines, different formations and variations will be discussed in another post. What it means however is that each rider should be aware of their responsibilities leading the bunch.

One of the key safety requirements is to avoid and call out obstacles such as potholes, debris, parked vehicles, other cyclists and anything else which requires the attention of the bunch. For all of these obstacles, a call and often a hand signal is used which is then passed back but each rider. When avoiding an obstacle, the lead rider chooses a safe line with the assumption that riders will follow.

The Lead Rider also needs to make a judgement call at intersections and for changed traffic situations, for example informing the bunch whether to stop at traffic lights which change from green to amber or to ride through (on the understanding that the bunch is small enough to pass before it turns red. For larger bunches this can be tricky and riders in the middle may need to make an independent call to stop. In this case, riders in the front group should slow down to allow riders behind to catch up.

 

For individuals and non-commercial groups such as cycling clubs, the Bunch Riding guide is free to download, share and print. It provides a concise and visual overview of all of the key safety considerations for bunch riding.

Smart Cyclist Bunch Riding Guide

Free Bunch Riding Guide to Increase Rider Safety

Safety for bunch cyclists is paramount, Smart Cyclist has just released the free Bunch Riding Guide which covers bunch riding etiquette, responsibilities and safety.

The safety of all riders is at risk when bunch riding, a single error can set off a chain reaction causing serious injury to others. Crashes in bunches are often the result of inexperience and inadequate knowledge of bunch riding etiquette.

The Bunch Riding Guide provides clear and concise information, illustrated with graphics for the benefit and safety of cyclists and cycling clubs.

Bunch Riding Etiquette

The Bunch Riding Guide is the first guide in the Cycling Essentials series and is available for free for individuals and cycling clubs. Cycling clubs can also apply for a free version of the Bunch Riding Guide branded with their club logo.

> Download the Bunch Riding Guide here

How sales tax works when you buy bikes and gear online

The big online stores for bikes, parts and accessories who serve customers across the globe are concentrated in the European Union and America, but irrespective of location, if they sell overseas the sales tax is removed.

In the UK the rate is 20% and when shopping online, when you select a delivery destination outside of the United Kingdom, this will be removed from the final price. In the United States, sales tax rates differ from state to state and likewise are (should be) removed for overseas purchases.

 

However

If you are in the European Union and order from an online retailer in another EU member nation, provided that they will deliver to you, they will also add and collect the sales tax applicable in your country. This means there is no additional local taxation.

If you are in the United States and order from a different state, tax may or may not be collected by the retailer, depending on the laws. If sales tax is not charged, many states will require you, by law, to include details of online purchases where no tax was collected in your tax return.

For customers who are ‘overseas’ generally your government will apply taxes and/or duty on your imports.

 

Tax Exemptions

When the tax is calculated and collected automatically, it makes it easy. There are a number of factors which can affect tax, in brief this includes:

• Trade Agreements between countries – certain products may be exempt
• Type of Product – likewise, certain items may be excluded or have a reduced tax rate
• Usage – exemptions on items for certain activities
• Taxation Threshold – Some countries impose tax and duties on items over a specific value

And more… each country is different so it is worth researching. When importing it may be required to pay the complete taxes and apply for exemptions for a refund.

Damaged Bike Delivery

Bike or gear damaged on delivery? You need to know this!

You can’t hide the disappointment when you order online to find the bike or gear damaged on delivery. This is going to be painful! But there are a few things you should do to turn wrongs into rights and avoid frustration and heartache.

 

1. Don’t accept badly damaged deliveries

If the package looks as though it has been through disaster zone, simply don’t sign for it. Tracked packages will go through the system and because it is recorded and returned and that you havn’t received it, you can clarify with support whether a replacement should be shipped or you want a refund.

 

2. Don’t open the package

For deliveries you may not have a choice, it doesn’t need to be signed off, or a family member, colleague or neighbour may have signed on your behalf. If the box is is a really poor condition, don’t open it. Leave it unopened and take photos and report to customer service.

This is a judgement call, if you ordered cycle wear then a crumpled box may not bother you. but it doesn’t hurt to take a photo before opening.

 

3. Document everything and take photos

As soon as you have a suspicion that something isn’t right, start taking photos, for example unpacking the box so you have photographic documentation to ‘prove’ to customer support for your favourite retailer that this was the condition in which you received the item.

Documentation continues to making ordered notes if you speak to customer support on the phone (time, date, name and reference number) and being organised. This will save you from trying to locate lost details and ensures that you can back yourself up.

 

4. If it looks fine, inspect it anyway

Take the time to check your order, is it complete. What about the condition of each item. While you may not spot mechanical defects, take the time to carefully look at the bike or gear, look for scratches, damage or anything which is out of the ordinary. Wheelsets should be true, bikes should have original protective wrapping and be in pristine condition while parts may be in original packaging or OEM packaging.

 

5. Report to the retailer as soon as possible

The better retailers include ‘returns’ information with the delivery as well as with confirmation emails to make it easy and efficient for customers. (Likewise, the bad retailers hide this information and make it difficult and painful to lodge a return).

Provide the details of your order and describe the issue. If you are emailing rather than phoning, you may have to wait for a response and instructions.

 

6. Don’t use or ride the bike or equipment

It is temping to use or try equipment, but if it is not in order, resist this tempation. In an example, a customer reported a damaged Colnago from Wiggle however took the bike for a short ride. Wiggle staff responded The tyres, chain, and brake rims show considerable signs of clear use and rejected the claim suggesting that the customer had caused the damage. Wiggle documented, though included photos of a different bike – and the question is, who is telling the truth?

 

7. Don’t break it

The bike or the cycling gear may have arrived safe and sound, but removing it from packaging, assembling and simply accidently misusing can cause damage. Take time to browse any instruction and unpack and assemble with care. Don’t rush and be sure you know what you are doing.

Assembly can be tricky, Many bike parts, particularly Carbon Fiber, have torque specifications. Don’t be afraid to ask a friend for help or ask to borrow a torque wrench. If something does happen, go to part three and document.

 

8. Be polite, be persistent

It is frustrating dealing with canned emails and 5 different staff members where you have to start again. The best retailers allocate a single staff member to help resolve your issue, while the worst ones bounce you around, don’t respond in a timely manner or simply ignore you. Be polite, by firm and persistent. Include your preferred resolution.

If you are ‘absolutely right’ but getting no where, it may be the support staffs role to reject or deny claims. Ask to elevate the issue or to speak with a manager.

 

9. Threaten the retailer

Having tried all reasonable approaches to reach a solution, if the retailer isn’t taking you seriously then it may be time to let them know you will be seeking alternative approaches to resolve. Keep in mind that defaming a retailer can get you into trouble, the online bike shop may become more interested in finding a satisfactory resolution if it keeps you from telling all of your friends, or reporting on social media and social communities or even reporting to the relevant consumer protection orgaisations.

 

10. When all else fails, take action

Some retailers may not be phased by a threat, running a poor business may mean they they are regularly threatened and that they know the threats are hollow. It is problematic if you have ordered overseas, customer protection laws may not apply however you should follow up with consumer protection agencies in the same country as the retailer.

Social media can be a good channel to draw attention to your plight though take care to be factual and publishing information which a retailer coud use to sue you. Other customers may have advice to help you.

Consider other options, if you feel that a retailer is not operating ethically you may be able to inform the consumer protection agency in your own country who can at least try to protect other consumes.

Posting a genuine, factual and detailed negative review on rating websites or evening writing a real letter (pen and paper) to management.

 

photo © Tracey Adams

Local Bike Shop Online Store

Can a local bike shop make it big online?

This is a loaded question, most of the worlds biggest online retailers started out as local bike store who did the right thing at the right time in the right place. Local bike shops have made it big and many others are trying.

The real question is, “why do some bike shops make it and others fail?” If the successful online shops did the right thing and the right time in the right place, what are the wrong things?

 

Lack of Genuine Committment

There is a different between trying to be successful online, and actually committing to online retail. The common scenario is that the local bike shop decides it wants to go online – pays a web design company $10,000 to create a shop and struggles to get sales. When they do get sales, fulfilling orders is messy and in no time the online inventory is out of date, along with the software and it discarded as an expensive failure…. because ‘the internet doesn’t work’.

The web design agency play a role in the demise for failing to educate the bike shop and showing them the big picture. And the cost conscious bike shop all too easily ignores or overlooks key parts of online retailing. As noted in an earlier article, If you build it, they won’t necessarily come.

Part of genuine committment is a vision to look beyond the word of the one-dimensional web design company and take the initiative to understand the building blocks. Also to question information, to analyze, to research and make smarter decisions.

The building blocks for successful online retail

A brief and incomplete list of some of the key building blocks:

Marketing: whether big or small, you have to invest in marketing. You have to spend money and the smart retailers also discover the best channels and keep trying new approaches.

Fulfillment: A massive topic, and for the sake of simplicity includes logistics. This is ensuring that the inventory is current, that delivery projections are up-to-date through to processing the order, packing, dispatching, delivery and tracking. All along keeping the customer informed and happy.

Customer Service: As with traditional retailers, customer service can make or break you. Of course the customer service requirements for online sale is different, but customers want immediate satisfaction and immediate answers. Word of mouth is just as important for online retailers and negative customer experiences are amplified even further in the internet.

Technology: From responsive websites to cater to smart phone and tablets to effective order process as well as clever technical integration and Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) and Search Engine Marketing (SEM). You need an expert at your side who knows technology.

Price: The internet makes it inherently easier to compare prices, as long as the retailer is trusted the the lowest price wins. Why pay more for the same product (an online retailer can hardly sell their ‘customer service’)?

 

The Visionary

Any bike shop can set-up online, but a visionary does more. They understand the potential of online to their business, they understand the change or adaption required. They invest and continue to drive, often employing specialists which push their online retail abilities beyond others.

It means that online retail is not for all, traditional businesses certainly shouldn’t ignore online retail (they need to adapt to remain competitive) but if a retailer isn’t truely dedicated to opening up online retail, they are often better off investing in their core business.

But their are plenty of sales out there, and just because one retailer is popular, it doesn’t mean they can maintain. Management and profit orientated decisions can taint a retailer leaving gaps for young online retailers who can do it better.

 

photo: © ubray

build your own bike or buy complete

Do you buying a complete bike, or build your own?

It is new bike time and traditionally you go to a local bike shop, or a few and decide on the brand and model. But in this day and age you can buy online and there are a host of online retailers, both local and overseas who carry big name brands and (cheaper) in house brands.

Yes, you pay the price for brand name bikes, but also limit many of the uncertainties with a lesser known, or unknown brands. Regardless of the direction you sway the other option is whether to buy a complete bike or buy the parts and build it up yourself.

 

The rule of thumb is…

Buying a complete bike will always be cheaper than buying the individual parts, but you already knew that.

Building your own bike can still be a better option if you already have certain parts, for example all of the components and need to replace or upgrade the frame. Or you have a special frame and need to make it ridable. But also purchasing from a supplier, brand or retailer who sells unbuilt frames or with completely different assemblies that you need.

It is worth recognising that a complete groupset is also cheaper than the invidual parts. And another strategy, also employed by some major online retailers is to purchase a complete bike, for example a top specced bike with an inferior frame (which is discarded or sold).

Assembling yourself requires sufficient skill and tools, and you have to get everything right. Compatibility is key. The reward when you know everything lines up is fulfillment.

photo: © Irrezolut

Shifting Expectations when Buying Online

When you go to your local bike shop and order a bike or gear that they don’t have in stock, it can take time. Typically you wait for the next delivery from the wholesaler, sometimes they stuff up and it takes forever but there are expectional circumstances when the bike or gear comes in quickly, you get the call – though still have to make the second trip to pick up.

From the comfort of your home (or workplace) you can place an online order – and with standard delivery it needs to arrive as fast as possible. Customers have different expectations online – the online world needs to be fast and a delay that would be normal when dealing with a local bike shop is a late delivery.

The big online shops such as Chain Reaction Cycles and Wiggle have packing and dispatch all figured out – providing the items are in-stock, your delivery can be on its way the following day. Sometimes when certain items are delayed, the remaining available items will be sent immediately so you have most of the things you ordered sooner.

For established retailers, the delays are all with the delivery companies. Just like a missing sock in a washing machine, there is a fair amount of mystery why package A arrives in 3 days and why package B arrives in 6 weeks – no one really knows but it costs the customer service hours pacifying irate customers.

But fast turnover times is supported and promoted by the retailers, so customers don’t have unreasonable expections rather online is a different game. The retailers on-top of their delivery partners while maintain customer satisfaction and drive repeat business.

Look out for End-Of-Season specials on Bikes and Gear

Many of the big brands have already announced their 2015 bikes or cycling gear and products. You will even find some bike shops stocking next years gear. The fact is, new is sexy and for some strange reason, next seasons gear or next years gear always looks better.

The other fact is, most of us are not performance cyclists and the one percent saving will make zero percent difference (just don’t tell the marketing departments). The real effect is that often last season’s bike or gear may be substantially reduced and you could save hundreds of Dollars, Pounds or Euros for a bike which is almost the same as next years model.

Some brands are trying to buck the trend by removing the ‘year’ and ignoring seasons as a bike model generally has a life span exceeding one year. Often after a few seasons (and a few paint jobs and accessory changes later), a top model bike may be relegated and replaced, but still remains in the program as it was a good bike.

Bike shops need to clear their floor stock and/or warehouse stock for the new gear so you need to keep your eye open from between October and February, more specific time-frames will depend upon your country’s sale trends as well as the individual brands time frames for supply. Don’t be afraid to ask “when do you expect the new bikes in?”

Online retailers however may have different cycles when it comes to new season gear. Local bike shops are often first inline and online retailers are second-in-line as they are the ‘clearing houses’. This means that online retailers may get new season stock much later however once again, it depends upon the brands and their relationship with the retailer.

The bottom line

If you chose last year’s bike or gear, the chances are that the savings you make over the new year and new season equipment are far great than the difference in performance benefit. Of course there may be differences and the new gear is new – so if you want New and can afford New, go for it.